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Oct
28th
Fri
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Reticulated Tracery
Wells Cathedral, Somerset, England, 12-15th century
Typical 	of the early 14th century,  makes use of the Ogee arch 	(double curves, shaped somewhat like an S) to create net patterns.

Reticulated Tracery

Wells Cathedral, Somerset, England, 12-15th century

Typical of the early 14th century, makes use of the Ogee arch (double curves, shaped somewhat like an S) to create net patterns.

(Source: Flickr / stevecadman)

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Panel Tracery
St Mary’s Church, Nottingham, England, 14-15th century
Transoms 	added horizontally to create even panel divisions. Featuring heavily in the perpendicular Gothic period.

Panel Tracery

St Mary’s Church, Nottingham, England, 14-15th century

Transoms added horizontally to create even panel divisions. Featuring heavily in the perpendicular Gothic period.

(Source: Flickr / gingerburn)

Oct
26th
Wed
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Geometric Tracery
Notre Dame de Paris, France, 12-14th century
The rib-work creates equal divisions for glass panelling, chiefly foiled, and circles, typical of this style, used in the high end of the window

Geometric Tracery

Notre Dame de Paris, France, 12-14th century

The rib-work creates equal divisions for glass panelling, chiefly foiled, and circles, typical of this style, used in the high end of the window

(Source: Flickr / extranoise)

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Tracery

The term ‘Tracery’ refers to the stone element used to hold glass in Gothic windows.

Plate Tracery The earliest form of Tracery, 12th century, is the process of cutting shapes through solid masonry.

Bar Tracery Introduced in the middle of the 13th century, Bar Tracery has patterns involving intersecting rib-work built up from the mullions. Other types include;

  • Curvilinear Tracery 14th Century style includes the uninterruption of flowing curves.

  • Geometrical Tracery Typical of the late 13th early 14th century, simple shapes like circles used in the high end of the window and the lancets.

  • Intersecting Tracery Typical of the 13th century, formed by interlocking mullions each branching off into two curved bars of the same radius but from different centres.

  • Loop Tracery Typical of the early 15th century, the form involved large uncusped loops.

  • Panel Tracery Transoms added horizontally to create even panel divisions.

  • Reticulated Tracery Typical of the early 14th century, makes use of the Ogee arch (double curves, shaped somewhat like an S) to create net patterns.

  • Y-Tracery Typical of the 13th century, the rib work branches off in to a Y shape.

Blind and Open Tracery As Bar Tracery opened the way for more complex patterns, Masons started to apply these patterns to things other than window openings, when used on solid walls, Blind Tracery can be used as openwork screens either matching existing window tracery of creating a visual counterpoint, featuring heavily in Rayonnant Gothic.

Islamic influence

The multilobed arches and complex compound arches found atop the columns in the Tracery is an example of architectural influence from Islamic forms in developing the Gothic Tracery. Mosques and fortresses were converted into Churches and Christian castles as the Recoquista spread through Spain, and its this pattern of conversion that led to the incorporation of Islamic elements to Gothic Christian Architecture.

Oct
24th
Mon
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Venetian Gothic
Doge’s Palace,Venice, 14-15th century
Residence of the Doge of Venice, a lightness is portrayed through the decorative and elegant traceries.

Venetian Gothic

Doge’s Palace,Venice, 14-15th century

Residence of the Doge of Venice, a lightness is portrayed through the decorative and elegant traceries.

(Source: Flickr / pinomoscato)

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Venetian Gothic
Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, Venice, 13-14th century
Rich Venetian Gothic style to neighbouring buildings shown through the decorative traceries.

Venetian Gothic

Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, Venice, 13-14th century

Rich Venetian Gothic style to neighbouring buildings shown through the decorative traceries.

(Source: Flickr / adam79)

Oct
22nd
Sat
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Venetian Gothic

The Venetian Gothic style originated in Venice in the 14th century, integrated with Byzantine styles from Constantinople. The style used Gothic lancet arch with Byzantine and Moorish architecture influences.

At a time when the Upper Class were funding new churches and houses for themselves, monks were bringing with them the Gothic style to Venice churches from mainland Italy.

Unique characteristics to the Venetian Gothic style, compared to other European cities was a desire for lightness and grace in a structure, Venice land proved valuable due to vast canals running through the city and so weight and size of structures were never more than what was needed.

Traceries in Venetian Gothic were constructed to support the whole weight of the building alluding to the extreme weightlessness of the building as a whole, where as in Northern Gothic construction they were only made to support stained glass.

During the 14-15th centuries the proportion in the central hall became a major aspect of the Venetian Gothic. The hall know as the Portego, evolved into a long passageway often opened by a loggia of Gothic arches.

Oct
20th
Thu
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Corinthian order
The Louvre Palace, 12th - 20th century
Currently working on my personal website, let me know what you think. (click my image to view it)

Corinthian order

The Louvre Palace, 12th - 20th century

Currently working on my personal website, let me know what you think. (click my image to view it)

Oct
19th
Wed
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Oct
16th
Sun
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Flying Buttress
Notre Dame de Paris, France, 12-14th century
Double arched flyers introduced around the apse to support the lateral force of the vault and wind loading from the roof.

Flying Buttress

Notre Dame de Paris, France, 12-14th century

Double arched flyers introduced around the apse to support the lateral force of the vault and wind loading from the roof.

(Source: Flickr / xelcise)